Seafood Expo North America

 

 


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Sunday, March 15th
11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Track Name: Seafood Sustainability
SeaWeb Seafood Summit Sustainability Updates: The Changing Landscape of Sustainable Seafood
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description:

Please note: sessions with this title were also submitted for the Seafood Summit by Monterey Bay Aquarium and the New England Aquarium, with the intent of having a two part set of panels addressing this theme either within either conference, or across the two conferences, to maximize dialogue and learning on this important topic.  This two part session will reflect on how the sustainable seafood movement has grown and evolved over the last 15 years, in order to provide direction for the future. In the first session, panelists and audience participants will reflect on significant progress and accomplishments over the last decade and a half. The session will highlight the work accomplished through eco-certification and Business-NGO partnerships, as these relationships have resulted in many innovations and collaborations and served as an important framework for driving progress. We will highlight the early leaders in the movement, and how their commitments and efforts evolved; the next phase of the movement which brought in many suppliers, producers, and others in the industry; and some of the more recent innovators contributing to the movement.  The second part of this session will address current business commitments and the future direction of those commitments and the sustainable seafood movement. We will begin the session with several speakers who will describe how their sustainable seafood strategies and partnerships have evolved. We will also reflect on the accomplishments and current challenges that come out of the first panel, and use that to encourage a lively dialogue on the priorities for Business-NGO partnerships to take on over the next decade. Based on the number of attendees, we will break out into small groups focusing on themes such as certifications, traceability, climate change, and the integration of social and environmental issues. We will end the session by coming back together to highlight ideas for better addressing current and future challenges in sustainability goals and strategies. The overarching goal of the 2 sessions is to provide opportunity for reflection, celebration of progress, and forecasting in order to begin developing a common dialogue and clear strategies for businesses and their NGO partners over the next decade.

 

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Track Name: Seafood Business & Marketplace
Tracking Sustainability Elements in Retail
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description:

Traceability in FDA parlance means food safety, but in seafood speak, the priority of sustainability equals that of food safety.  Many retailers are requiring the industry to track chain of custody throughout the supply chain for proof that sustainable stock is being supplied and offered for sale.  This opens the question of what data need be monitored for guarantee of sustainability. Industry seeks a business tool that houses a database for both traceability and sustainability data elements and also is compatible with normal business transactions. Toward that goal, an NFI Working Group is studying individual supply chains in “proof of concept (POC).” The POC tests industry’s ability to electronically record Key Data Elements of certain finfish and seafood products throughout the supply chain coupled with sustainability elements that meet retailers’ requirements. Key to industry success is implementing the common business tool Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) as the database. The panel in this session will discuss the POC study and how industry is working cooperatively with retail to capture key sustainability elements using EDI.

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Moderator:
Dr. Barbara Blakistone,
Director, Scientific Affairs
,
National Fisheries Institute
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Track Name: Seafood Saftey, Compliance & Quality Assurance
Advanced Hygienic Design of Food Processing Equipment
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: The workshop describes our journey from manufacturing motion control components that are functional for the food industry to motion control components that are functional but also durable and cleanable in harsh wash-down environments required by the food industry.  We explore the value intersection of machinery builders and food processors including the negotiation process that provides durable cleanable machines that are cost effective to meet ROI requirements.  We finish with a challenge to food processors and machinery builders to push component suppliers to develop products that advance food safety.
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12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Track Name: Seafood Sustainability
Moving Towards Alignment: Tuna Sustainability
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: A panel discussion that explores the challenges and benefits of aligning policies, advocacy and science in the area of tuna sustainability.  The panel potentially will include representatives from ISSF (International Seafood Sustainability Foundation), WWF, Fishwise, NE Aquarium, and/or SFP.  The discussion will be framed by an initial presentation from Susan Jackson, President of ISSF who will outline the areas of current alignment and the potential environmental impact that continued efforts will have on the global tuna stocks.  Additionally, each panelist will provide an overview of their perspective on the topic and barriers to success. Benefiting from active participation with their significant experience and roles the diverse stakeholders can advance a strong profile for science-based approaches to tuna sustainability.
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Moderator:
Susan Jackson,
President
,
International Seafood Sustainability Foundation
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Track Name: Seafood Business & Marketplace
How to Avoid the Next Delicious Disaster and Create a New and Disruptive Product that Consumers Crave
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description:

Everyone's goal in the food business is to satisfy the ever changing needs of consumers.  The fact is today we are have to satisfy a consumers' Nutritional, Functional, Emotional, Cultural and Social need states when creating offering new seafood products or new brands. This is perhaps the most challenging time in history to create new products that become hits.  This session will outline how all seafood companies can find unique insights to drive new product development that will ring the cash register and delight consumers. It will cover new  techniques to drive the new product development that transform "seafood" from commodity to value added branded products.   See how one company took the journey and now is enjoying the rewards.

 

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Track Name: Seafood Saftey, Compliance & Quality Assurance
Traceability: Enhancing Business Performance, Reducing Waste and Fighting Fraud
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description:

The session will review the results of research on the utility and impact of traceability as a tool to manage the dramatically changing nature of the international seafood industry. The presentation will encompass recent investigations by the Global Food Traceability Center into major seafood producing and consuming nations, such as China, Norway, Chile, the USA, and others.  The presentation will provide an overview of the findings on how can affect consumer perceptions of seafood, how it can help reduce waste in the food system, and boost business performance.  It will also illustrate an available decision support tool that will be especially useful for small and mid-sized businesses that are seeking to understand the payback (ROI) business cases of their traceability investments.

 

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2:15 pm - 3:15 pm
Track Name:
Keynote
Session Type: Keynote
Session Description: Details will be posted soon.  Please check back.
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3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Track Name: Seafood Sustainability
The Future of Credible Certification: Where Do We Go From Here?
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: In recent years, there has been a significant amount of dialog over what constitutes a credible, independent certification standard. This has raised the question: what sustainability assessment criteria are rigorous enough to evaluate fisheries fairly and to give buyers and consumers a high degree of confidence that a fishery is sustainably managed? One example of this is the Alaska salmon industry, which has recently transitioned away from MSC to an FAO-based model.   In addition to High Liner Foods, invited panelists will include the Marine Stewardship Council, The Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, Iceland Responsible Fisheries, Aquaculture Stewardship Council, Global Aquaculture Alliance, Monterey Bay Aquarium, Oceanwise and Fishwise. The panel will engage in a constructive dialog to help shape the future of credible certification. They will tackle questions such as: What will the future of credible sustainable certifications look like? What constitutes best methods to evaluate a fishery or aquaculture facility?  Is more competition for third party certification best, or should there be a set of unified standards/certifications?
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Track Name: Seafood Business & Marketplace
Retail Seafood - The Problem and The Cure
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description:

Seafood sales represent approximately 1.5 % of total store sales in America. Given health benefits, endorsement by the entire medical community and fitness concerns, why isn't it 3 to 4 times that? The answer to that question and the solution form the foundation of the presentation. That there exists a problem must be acknowledged. The 1.5% of seafood sales to total store sales is a damning statistic when considering that meat averages anywhere from 8 to 18%. The short answer is unreliability - 20 purchases of fresh seafood in a row is unlikely to provide 20 satisfying experiences, a problem fresh poultry doesn't have. The reason for this will be revealed, as well as the solution.  Seafood sales will increase dramatically once fresh seafood achieves the reliability of fresh poultry. Far from discounting, seafood's solution lies in enhanced quality and decreased variety. For an experienced customer, the price of seafood is far from the first consideration when making a purchase. What is important will be examined, as well as what a the P&L of a profitable seafood display looks like. The solution to seafood is as simple as the cultural obstacles that must be surmounted to execute them are complicated.

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Track Name: Seafood Saftey, Compliance & Quality Assurance
IUU Fishing
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: Details coming soon.  Please check back.
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Monday, March 16th
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Track Name: Seafood Sustainability
2 Billion People are Coming to Dinner, Let's Feed them Fish!
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: In their 2008 report, The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations stated that 80% of the world’s wild fisheries were harvested at or above their sustainable limits. In the report’s 2014 edition, their assessment has risen to 90%.  Quite simply, the wild fish supply cannot expand and, in the face of demographic and population changes it seems pretty clear, if we are going to continue to eat fish they will come from farms.  The farms must meet new and existing challenges to ensure that fish are raised sustainably, i.e. in a way that does not diminish the ability to farm in the distant future of generations hence. This will require both new knowledge and  new innovations.  The concerted efforts of environmental NGOs, academics and the farmers who deliver the changes are poised to deliver our future fish supply. I will discuss both challenges and how subsets of them are being met.
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Track Name: Seafood Business & Marketplace
Technology and Finance Panel
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: Details will be posted soon.  Please check back. 
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Track Name: Seafood Saftey, Compliance & Quality Assurance
Advanced Seafood Safety and Compliance by the Federal Regulators
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: On June 17, 2014, President Obama announced a bold plan to combat illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing and seafood fraud.  Approximately 25% of seafood sold in the United States is mislabeled. Federal authorities, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the United States Customs and Border Protection, and Homeland Security Investigations, in cooperation with the National Ocean Council, are identifying and prosecuting persons and companies violating food safety and truth in labeling laws regarding seafood.  Understanding the dynamic changes occurring in the seafood industry from foreign sourcing, to traceability, to distribution, and complying with the new laws and regulations aggressively being pursued by law enforcement will help any company involved in the seafood industry.
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Moderator:
Peter Quinter,
Chair, Customs & International Trade Law Group
,
GrayRobinson, P.A.
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Panelist:
Robert Becerra,
Principal
,
Becerra Law, P.A.
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Panelist:
Annie Hughes,
Business Development Director
,
ABC Research Laboratories
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Panelist:
Francisco Troconis,
Director of Quality Assurance & Compliance
,
John Keeler & Co, Inc. dba Blue Star Food Products
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12:45 pm - 2:15 pm
Track Name: Seafood Business & Marketplace
SeafoodSource.com presents: Consumer Focus Report
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: Details coming soon.  Please check back.
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2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Track Name: Seafood Sustainability
Storytelling as a Way Increase Value and Promote Sustainability
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: Using storytelling we can help create higher perceived value and better traceability for the products that are harvested from the oceans.  We will give examples of programs the state has started and how they have been successful.
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Track Name: Seafood Business & Marketplace
Market Shift Case Studies
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: Details coming soon.  Please check back.
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Track Name: Seafood Saftey, Compliance & Quality Assurance
Seafood Fraud: Solutions from the Field
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: The need for traceability of food supply chains is now widely recognized and is becoming more common in international trade. Traceability in global seafood chains is essential to combat seafood fraud and species substitutions, protect public health, demonstrate legality and sustainability claims, and ensure seafood labels are accurate and verifiable.  Over the past decade, various aspects seafood fraud and mislabeling have been presented at Seafood Expo North America panels, yet the problem still persists.    This panel will convene a range of experts in fisheries, seafood and technology to discuss the threat of mislabeling and benefits of seafood traceability while exploring the increasing requirement for catch documentation and traceability around the world.  The panel will offer concrete examples of the benefits that traceability is providing to the fishing, seafood, hospitality and retail industries as well as consumers and fisheries managers.
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3:45 pm - 5:00 pm
Track Name: Seafood Sustainability
What's in a Claim?: Making Responsible Environmental Market Claims in the Seafood Marketplace
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: The seafood industry has adopted many varied approaches for communicating environmental claims, including on product claims (certification/ranking), company sourcing and/or sustainability policies, cooperative reporting initiatives, and more. The panel will offer perspectives on a range of different approaches. They will also provide insight and advice for better practice in making environmental market claims, incorporating available guidelines, best practices, and legal considerations (e.g., FTC Green Guides, ISEAL Credibility Principles, FAO Guidelines). After short presentations the audience and the moderator will be asked for case studies or examples of approaches to discuss and offer perspective on.
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Track Name: Seafood Business & Marketplace
Branding 101: How Does Your Business Become A Brand
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description:

Brands are about the marriage of fact and narrative. In the incredibly competitive food world, it's important to convey what makes you different — your special capabilities and traits — so that potential customers can easily understand what sets you and your business, product or offering apart from the competition. Generally, we think that brands are about marketing and advertising, and that they only apply to big brands, “out there,” whereas the real material we use in defining and constructing our own brands stems from our belief systems and our own psychology, whether we are working as individuals or as part of a larger business or organization. A strong brand marries this deep exploration with objective analysis to come to market in a meaningful way, no matter the size or type of the offering. This presentation is a primer on brand definition, where Beth will talk about major brands, how they do it, and give guidance on how to define your brand within your market. Learn about claiming the territory — both internally and externally — that defines who you are and what you are offering in the marketplace.

Why is this helpful? Brand definition has very practical applications, as it is at the core of all marketing activities, providing the guide for allocation of your precious financial and personnel resources. Getting hold of your brand will help you to be happier in your work and more successful in your career, and can translate into real increases in sales and market share. Strong and consistent brands ensure that your consumers come back to you again and again. You will come away thinking like a brand strategist, and with some practical tools to use in looking at your own brand, whether you’re a brand manager for a major food company, a chef, a restaurateur, or have just landed some shelf space at the local gourmet market.

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Moderator:
Beth Taubner,
Brand Strategist -- Creative Director
,
Mercurylab
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Track Name: Seafood Saftey, Compliance & Quality Assurance
Common Senses: USDA Research to Improve Sensory Quality of Aquaculture Products
Session Type: Breakout
Session Description: This session, “Common Senses: USDA Research to Improve Sensory Quality of Aquaculture Products,” will focus on research that addresses and improves the consumer experience of seafoods produced in aquaculture. Aquaculture, which currently produces half the world’s fishery products, will be an increasingly important source of seafood in the future. Unlike wild-caught foods, the controlled environment of aquaculture provides abundant opportunities to manipulate and improve product quality. A panel of four of the world’s top aquaculture scientists will describe the important seafood product quality traits, how quality traits are measured, and how they can be improved through control of the environment, nutrition and feeding, and selective breeding.  The focus will be on finfish—Atlantic salmon, arctic charr and rainbow trout from cold water, and catfish from warm water.  The presentation on salmon and charr will focus on flesh color and the amount and types of fats present in fillets (heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids) and the ways to improve these qualities. Trout work is focused on improving texture attributes such as firmness. Higher fillet percentages, and sensory and chemical approaches to evaluating flavor, texture and color and how to improve these qualities, will be the focus for catfish.
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